Diana Nyad Answers Skeptics About Her Cuba-to-U.S. Swim

updated 09/11/2013 AT 2:00 PM ET

originally published 09/11/2013 AT 2:05 PM ET

Addressing her skeptics, Diana Nyad claimed the right to set the ground rules for future swims from Cuba to Florida without a shark cage.

“I swam. We made it, our team, from the rocks of Cuba to the beach of Florida, in squeaky-clean, ethical fashion,” Nyad said.

Speculation that she had gotten into or held onto a boat during part of her 53-hour journey drove Nyad and her team to hold a lengthy conference call Tuesday night with about a dozen members of the marathon swimming community.

Nyad said it was her understanding of the sport that the first person to make a crossing got to set the rules for that body of water. She said her “Florida Straits Rules” would largely maintain what they all agree on: no flippers, no shark cage, no getting out of the water, never holding on to the boat, never holding on to the kayak, never being supported by another human being or being lifted up or helped with buoyancy.

She would allow innovations such as the protective full-body suit and mask she wore to shield herself from the venomous jellyfish that can alter a swim as much as a strong current. Marathon swimming purists had questioned whether that gear violated the traditions of the sport.

“It is the only way. The swim requires it,” Nyad said. “I don’t mean to fly in the face of your rules, but for my own life’s safety, a literal life-and-death measure, that’s the way we did it.”

Nyad said she never left the water or allowed her support team to help her beyond handing her food and assisting her with her jellyfish suit.

Her critics have been skeptical about long stretches of the 53-hour swim were Nyad appeared to have either picked up incredible speed or to have gone without food or drink. Since Nyad finished her swim Sept. 2 in Key West, Fla., long-distance swimmers have been debating the topic on social media and in online forums.

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