Marilyn Monroe's Love Letters with Joe DiMaggio, Arthur Miller Sell for Thousands

Some really do like it hot.

Marilyn Monroe’s love letters and personal items sold for sky high prices Saturday when Julien’s Auctions in Beverly Hills put pieces of celebrity history up for auction.

Read Marilyn Monroe's Very Racy Love Letter from Arthur Miller

Sexting wouldn’t be invented for another half-century. But that didn’t stop Arthur Miller from expressing some rather explicit long-distance passion for Marilyn Monroe.

In the months before the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright of Death of a Salesman wed the screen siren, then the most famous star in the world, he was head over heels in love with her – and then some.

Marilyn Monroe's Lost Love Letters to Be Auctioned

It’s no secret Joe DiMaggio loved Marilyn Monroe. The baseball great cried at her funeral and for 20 years had flowers placed at her crypt several times a week.

After Lauren Bacall's Passing, Every Hollywood Legend Name-Checked in 'Vogue' Is Dead

DIMAGGIO: LUNG CANCER

Baseball legend Joe DiMaggio has been diagnosed with lung cancer and as having recently suffered a heart attack, reports New York TV station WPIX, citing three sources who confirmed the illnesses. DiMaggio has been hospitalized in Hollywood FL for five weeks. The Yankee Clipper, who will turn 84 on Wednesday, was to have thrown out one of the ceremonial first pitches at this year’s World Series but was hospitalized just before the series began. He reportedly was to have been released from the hospital about three weeks ago but suffered a setback.

Joltin' Joe Setback

Joe DiMaggio had another “serious setback” on Monday in his slow recovery from lung cancer surgery – an infection that the doctors already thought they had brought under control. The 84-year-old Hall of Famer developed the lung infection on Friday, but after a weekend of intensive treatment in a Florida hospital, his temperature and white blood cell count were back to normal Monday morning, said Dr. Earl Barron. “We have every hope that he will survive, but anything can happen,” Barron told the Associated Press. “Considering his age, it’s going to be a long road back for him.”

Joltin' Joe DiMaggio Still Joltin'!

Joe DiMaggio drew a smile from his doctor Thursday with a feisty request. “I want to get the hell out of here and go home,” the former Yankees slugger said. The 84-year-old DiMaggio continues to show improvement in a Florida hospital after developing a lung infection as he battles lung cancer. “Things are looking up today, but who knows what will happen tomorrow,” said Dr. Earl Barron, DiMaggio’s cardiologist. DiMaggio had no fever, and his white blood cell count was normal.

DiMaggio Fights for Life

Doctors had gloomy news about baseball legend Joe DiMaggio on Monday, but by Tuesday they were saying his condition had improved slightly. On Monday it was believed that the Yankee Clipper, 84, was near death, backsliding in his fight to recover from lung cancer surgery and pneumonia. DiMaggio’s attorney Morris Engelberg said close friends and family members are preparing for the worst, having been summoned to DiMaggio’s bedside at Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood FL. Medical reports say DiMaggio is battling a fever, a lung infection and high blood pressure.

Joltin' Joe's Upswing

Joe DiMaggio has improved dramatically from a serious lung infection and fever, his doctor said Tuesday. “We called the family (Monday) because, frankly, we thought we were getting down to the last road,” Dr. Earl Barron told the Associated Press Tuesday. “Today, there’s a little more hope.” DiMaggio, recovering from Oct. 14 lung cancer surgery (his right lung was removed), fought off a 102-degree fever, pneumonia in his good lung and an intestinal infection that developed over the weekend.

Joe to Docs: Shut Up!

Just two days after awakening from a coma, Joe DiMaggio ordered his doctors to stop giving public updates on his health. “We allowed Joe to talk this morning, and he was very angry,” Dr. Earl Barron said Sunday. “He said, ‘No more press.’” Barron, who heads the six-person team treating the Hall of Famer at a Hollywood FL hospital, said he could no longer comment on DiMaggio’s health. He refused to say whether his condition had been upgraded from critical to serious, as had been expected.

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